Corporate Coaching and consultation

What is coaching? When to Opt for Mentoring Program

Coaching is a professional relationship that helps people produce extraordinary results in their lives, careers, businesses or organizations, helping them tobridge the gap between where they are now and where they want to be. Coaches partner with their clients to design the life they want, bring out their clients’ own brilliance and resources so that they can achieve excellence and create purposeful, extraordinary lives. By creating clarity, coaching moves the client into action, accelerating their progress by providing greater focus and awareness of all the possibilities which exist to create fulfilling lives.

ILCT founder Patrick Williams described coaching as

“a powerful, human relationship where trained coaches assist people to design their future rather than help them get over their past . . . coaches aid clients in creating visions and goals for ALL aspects of their lives and in creating multiple strategies to support achieving those goals. Coaches recognize the brilliance of each client and their personal power to discover their own solutions when provided with support, accountability, and unconditional, positive regard.”

— Therapist as Life Coach, 2007

According to the International Coach Federation

Coaches honor the client as the expert in his or her life and work and believe every client is creative, resourceful and whole. Standing on this foundation, the coach’s responsibility is to:

  • Discover, clarify, and align with what the client wants to achieve
  • Encourage client self-discovery
  • Elicit client-generated solutions and strategies
  • Hold the client responsible and accountable

This process helps clients dramatically improve their outlook on work and life, while improving their leadership skills and unlocking their potential.

Where did the concept of coaching originate?

Historically, there have always been “coaches” of some sort in society. It might have been the town priest, the shaman, an elder (grandfather, uncle) or some other mentor relationship. Prior to the evolution of the coach training programs, coaching was a term primarily used in the arts (voice coaches, drama coaches), athletics, and the corporate world. Many executives hired outside consultants as coaches or mentors to give them an outside and unbiased view of their business life and get help with their personal life as well.

Now coaching is seen as both valuable and convenient to the general public for assistance in “total life coaching.” Due to the “formal” training available to prospective coaches who come from a variety of disciplines and work experience, the general public can now find a personal coach who is well trained to assist them in achieving their big goals and desires in their personal or their professional life.

What is the philosophy behind coaching?

The underlying philosophy behind coaching is that we humans have immeasurable resources of energy, wisdom, ability and genius waiting to be set in motion. We can create the life we want faster and more easily by partnering with a coach who helps us utilize these resources to facilitate change and realize our potential.

Many of the early psychological theories (Adler, Jung, Ellis) and current theories such as Positive Psychology and the “solution focused” therapies are antecedents to modern day coaching. Instead of pathology as the main focus, these theories focus on behavior change through increased awareness and choices for desired future results and solutions to current problems in living, with the individual as the creator and artist of his or her life.

How does coaching differ from therapy and other helping professions?

Professional coaches know the importance of identifying the characteristics and ethical considerations which differentiate coaching from consulting, therapy, mentoring, counseling, or even friendship and support group membership.

While coaching and therapy share some similarities, psychotherapy often focuses on the impact the past has on the present, on healing psychological dysfunction, and on relieving emotional pain. The therapist is considered to be the expert, the one with answers about what is right for the client.

Coaching focuses on the present and future, the client’s strengths, life purpose and goals, working with clients to create possibilities to enrich their life. Based on the belief that all individuals are whole, capable individuals, coaching assumes the client is expert, able to determine what is best for their lives and the coach works along with them to maximize their personal and professional potentials, to close the gaps to create extraordinary lives.

To learn more about the differences, download ILCT founder Dr. Patrick Williams’ article Borderline: Understanding the relationship between therapy and coaching.

Why has the industry attained such record growth?

We are in a time when the field and practice of coaching is both growing and evolving. The demand for coaching came into being when stressed out executives started seeking help in coping with their professional and personal lives. In addition, as companies started downsizing and outplacing, and baby boomers started turning 50, coaches were hired to ease traumatic transitions and to help people get back on track. Since then the profession of coaching has continued to grow and expand. Why? Quite simply, because it works!

A 2014 Global Coaching Client Study conducted on behalf of the International Coach Federation found that of those individuals who had received coaching

80% saw improved self-confidence

73% saw improved relationships

72% saw improved communication skills

70% saw improved work performance

61% saw improved business management

57% saw improved time management

51% saw improved team performance

And of those surveyed, 99% indicated that there were “somewhat or fully satisfied with their coaching experience” and 96% said they would do it again.

When you think about it, at any one time, the lives of about 10% of the population are being negatively impacted by mental illness and issues from their past which need to be resolved to move forward. The rest of the population (90%) for whom psychotherapy is not indicated, can benefit from the holistic, strength based approach of coaching which supports them to create more rewarding, fulfilling lives, to find and achieve their dreams.

The Differences Between Coaching & Mentoring

It’s understandable that you might think mentoring and coaching are similar or even the same thing. But they’re not. Both warrant consideration in the workplace. Here are five differentiators that we think are important.

But be sure to download our FREE white paper that discusses the complete list of differences (all 25 of them!) between coaching and mentoring.

Differentiator #1: 

Coaching is task oriented. The focus is on concrete issues, such as managing more effectively, speaking more articulately, and learning how to think strategically. This requires a content expert (coach) who is capable of teaching the coachee how to develop these skills.

Mentoring is relationship oriented. It seeks to provide a safe environment where the mentoree shares whatever issues affect his or her professional and personal success. Although specific learning goals or competencies may be used as a basis for creating the relationship, its focus goes beyond these areas to include things, such as work/life balance, self-confidence, self-perception, and how the personal influences the professional.

Differentiator #2:

Coaching is short term. A coach can successfully be involved with a coachee for a short period of time, maybe even just a few sessions. The coaching lasts for as long as is needed, depending on the purpose of the coaching relationship.

Mentoring is always long term. Mentoring, to be successful, requires time in which both partners can learn about one another and build a climate of trust that creates an environment in which the mentoree can feel secure in sharing the real issues that impact his or her success. Successful mentoring relationships last nine months to a year.

Differentiator #3:

Coaching is performance driven. The purpose of coaching is to improve the individual’s performance on the job. This involves either enhancing current skills or acquiring new skills. Once the coachee successfully acquires the skills, the coach is no longer needed.

Mentoring is development driven. Its purpose is to develop the individual not only for the current job, but also for the future. This distinction differentiates the role of the immediate manager and that of the mentor. It also reduces the possibility of creating conflict between the employee’s manager and the mentor.

Differentiator #4:

Coaching does not require design. Coaching can be conducted almost immediately on any given topic. If a company seeks to provide coaching to a large group of individuals, then certainly an amount of design is involved in order to determine the competency area, expertise needed, and assessment tools used, but this does not necessarily require a long lead-time to actually implement the coaching program.

Mentoring requires a design phase in order to determine the strategic purpose for mentoring, the focus areas of the relationship, the specific mentoring models, and the specific components that will guide the relationship, especially the matching process.

Differentiator # 5: 

The coachee’s immediate manager is a critical partner in coaching. She or he often provides the coach with feedback on areas in which his or her employee is in need of coaching. This coach uses this information to guide the coaching process

In mentoring, the immediate manager is indirectly involved. Although she or he may offer suggestions to the employee on how to best use the mentoring experience or may provide a recommendation to the matching committee on what would constitute a good match, the manager has no link to the mentor and they do not communicate at all during the mentoring relationship. This helps maintain the mentoring relationship’s integrity.

When to consider coaching:

  • When a company is seeking to develop its employees in specific competencies using performance management tools and involving the immediate manager
  • When a company has a number of talented employees who are not meeting expectations
  • When a company is introducing a new system or program
  • When a company has a small group of individuals (5-8) in need of increased competency in specific areas
  • When a leader or executive needs assistance in acquiring a new skill as an additional responsibility

When to consider mentoring:

  • When a company is seeking to develop its leaders or talent pool as part of succession planning
  • When a company seeks to develop its diverse employees to remove barriers that hinder their success
  • When a company seeks to more completely develop its employees in ways that are additional to the acquisition of specific skills/competencies
  • When a company seeks to retain its internal expertise and experience residing in its baby boomer employees for future generations
  • When a company wants to create a workforce that balances the professional and the personal

To book a personal appointment with one of our coaches, Call, Whatsapp or Email Now!